Saturday, January 7, 2012

Celebrating color

Santa brought me several instructional watercolor DVDs. One of them by Jean Haines - a DVD bound to build up your enthusiasm and make you pick up the brushes. After watching the demonstration on painting cockerels, I had to try it myself. I understand now why Jean is so excited about this subject. It gives the opportunity to really enjoy color.

Arches 140lb, 28 x 19 cm
I found a couple of  photos of roosters that I have taken on my vacations.  The photo of this first handsome guy above was taken in the Swiss ethnographic village of Ballenberg.


Arches 140lb, 19 x 28 cm
And this cocky guy (pun intended) I saw pacing self-importantly on a sunny city square at Key West, Florida.

8 comments:

Judy said...

I imagine this subject is really enjoyable to paint. And the results are great! My favorite is the first one!

Jane said...

Three wonderful roosters, so alive and full of colors...the last one made me really chuckle :-)) I have noticed that painting roosters is a classic , I never did one...but maybe I will try, because as you said, you get a chance to really use different colors. Lovely job Blaga.

Lydie said...

I love your roosters! these are joyful and colorful.

Tito said...

Hi Blaga, you really did a fantastic job with these roosters, I like very much the third one, not only for the nice colors but for the his movement. Ciao!

Isabelle said...

ils ont fier allures ces coq .

Blaga said...

That's true, Judy, you are free to use any color and whatever happens on the paper, is still fine. Thank you!

Thank you, Jane! The last guy has an attitude, doesn't he :) Lot's of fun painting these rosters.

Thank you, Lydie!

Thank you, Tito! The first two are more influenced by Jean's style of painting. The third one is more "me" and I'm glad you liked it.

Merci, Isabelle! Je suppose que on doit être fier si on est un coq :)

Jane Minter said...

really love the third one ... see you are enjoying jeans dvd .

Nora MacPhail said...

Nicely done! You really kept their shape while still keeping it loose and "watercolory".